• LF101 Elementary French 1

    4 Credits

    Stresses mastery of essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is ""living"" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in French. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.

    Instructors Michaele Gauduchon, Pierre Hurel
  • LF102 Elementary French 2

    4 Credits

    Continuation of LF 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.

    Instructors Pierre Hurel
  • LI120 Introduction to Literary Studies

    4 Credits

    Gives students intensive practice in literary analysis, critical writing, and related research. In discussing primary texts, considerable attention is given to elements of the different genres (e.g., narrative point of view, narrative structure, metrical and free verse), as well as to issues relevant across literary genres (e.g., form and content, voice, contexts, tone). Readings are chosen from the following genres: poetry, drama, and narrative modes. Readings also include selected literary theory and criticism.

    Instructors Adele Lee, Cristina Pérez-Arranz, Eugene Chang, George Baroud, George Vahamikos, Matthew Messer, Rosario Swanson
  • LI201 Literary Foundations

    4 Credits

    Surveys foundational works of literature spanning a wide range of periods, genres, and regions in order to familiarize students with broad principles in literary and cultural history. Works studied may include ancient Greek and other premodern epic, lyric, and drama along with cognate and contrasting traditions.

    Instructors Alexander Ruggeri, George Baroud, George Vahamikos, William Donoghue
  • LI202 U.S./American Literatures

    4 Credits

    Introduces students to the literary history of the United States from the colonial period to the modern by surveying a wide range of texts, including canonical and non-canonical authors in several genres. The course examines questions such as: How is the narrative of Americanness constructed? How have authors employed the literary craft to explore the construction of the self in relation to transcendentalism, abolitionism, feminism, class consciousness, and national belonging? This course focuses on writers such as Whatley, Apress, Melville, Douglass, Whitman, Stowe, Rowlandson, Hurston, Steinbeck, and Paredes.

    Instructors Alex Moskowitz, Christine Casson, Matthew Scully
  • LI203 Literatures in English

    4 Credits

    A historical overview of several genres of non-U.S. literatures written in English from Renaissance through the 21st century. This course focuses on writers such as More, Defoe, Bronte, Shakespeare, Brontë, Joyce, Achebe, Rhys, Coetzee, and Walcott.

    Instructors Alexander Ruggeri, Catherine Long, Robert Dulgarian, Shannon Derby
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Contemporary Fairy Tales

    4 Credits

    Through the study of the origins and development of fairy tales, myths, and folk stories, we’ll explore how storytelling shapes our sense of identity. We’ll examine the recurring motifs within these enduring tales and study why and how contemporary authors subvert those themes and lessons. The contemporary tale does not promise false happiness but enlightens us about the distorted manner in which our world has been transformed.

    Instructors Peter Shippy
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Documentary Poetry

    4 Credits

    What is a poem supposed to do and say? In this class, we will investigate poetry as both a creative and documentary art and consider the social, political, cultural, and personal forces and issues that prompt poets to incorporate research into their poetry. We’ll examine various modes of documenting and analyze both how different poets include documentary materials in their work and how this, in turn, expands our ideas of what a poem is and the subjects it might address. Over the course of the semester, students will read six collections of poetry and their source material and respond critically to them via class discussion, interviews with the poets, imitations, interviews, and analytical essays. Students will develop and strengthen their close reading skills and gain experience with critical analysis, creative response, and research as we investigate each poet’s documentary and poetic project as a means of understanding the place of poetry in our contemporary social, political, and historical landscape.

    Instructors Anna Ross
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Ekphrastic Literature

    4 Credits

    In this course we’ll enter into an old conversation concerning the special relationship between literature and art, lively in Sophocles’ Greece and China, during the Tang Dynasty, renewed in Renaissance Europe, collaged by Dada and surrealist writers in Paris, Africa, and South America and Americanized in 1950s New York, by the poets of the Beat and New York Schools. We’ll study contemporary poetry, prose, and plays to see how they conjure and examine music, film, cartoons, as well as traditional visual arts.

    Instructors Peter Shippy
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Myth and Mythography

    4 Credits

    The course offers a basic introduction to classical myth considered both as an evolving set of cultural practices and as an object of ‘mythographic’ study. Taking as its focus ‘classical myth’ as, on the one hand, a heterogeneous collection of ‘witnesses’ and, on the other hand, an in some sense overdetermined (if evolving) complex of cultural practices and meanings, the course will explore relations between different modes of representing myth in the classical world. The course will also allow students to evaluate and interrogate a range of modern scholarly approaches to analysing myth; to this end, the course will compare particular approaches to the study of classical myth to the study of other traditions. Finally, the course will consider the rôle of classical myth in modern texts.

    Instructors Robert Dulgarian