Transcript: Season 4, Episode 3

Jill Bream


Georgette Pierre:
What does it mean to make it big? Well, it depends on who you ask and we did. Welcome to Making It Big In 30 Minutes, a podcast for, by and about the Emerson community. You're about to meet an Emersonian who's making it: making a living, making a difference and sometimes making it up as they go. I'm your host and alum, Georgette Pierre. If you like what you hear, subscribe and share with your friends and meet me and other Emersonians over on Emerge, the only digital platform exclusive to the Emerson community. Go to emerge.emerson.edu for more.

Jill Bream is a New York City based costume designer and stylist, working in TV, film and commercials. She first got her start as an assistant to June Ambrose, helping to create iconic looks for artists such as Jay-Z, Neo and Mary J. Blige. She then went on to work with fashion brand, Isaac Mizrahi New York, styling runway fashion shows and national advertising campaigns. Currently known for her work as a costume designer for the filming unit at Saturday Night Live, Jill and I get into the nitty gritty of choosing costume design versus styling, where she got her start. With her work running the gamut with Netflix, Comedy Central, NBC, CBS, Hulu, Bravo and the Disney channel, I give you Jill Bream on making it as a costume designer.

Jill, so honored to be here with you today. Thank you so much for your time.

Jill Bream:
Thank you.

Georgette:
It was so funny when I read your background, I was like, "Oh, June Ambrose. I used to [inaudible 00:01:32] when her show came out."

Jill:
Oh, funny. She actually-

Georgette:
That was so dope, so I was like, "Yeah."

Jill:
She asked me for a second to be on it with her. And then, I was like, "I don't think so. I don't think I can do this. I love you, June, but I can't do this."

Georgette:
You can't do this. Yeah. When people hear the term costume designer, some may think of a wardrobe stylist. What is the role of a costume designer as it relates to our industry of working in TV, film and commercials?

Jill:
A costume designer is putting clothing on a scripted character, so something that's been written and that makes it a little bit different than a wardrobe stylist because a wardrobe stylist for something like VH1, people that are coming on to, I guess they don't have TRL or any of the live programming anymore, but if you are just yourself and you need to be dressed, you will hire a wardrobe stylist.

Georgette:
That makes sense. You know what's so funny? I don't know why I thought anything different, right? Because I work in TV too, but I just ...

Jill:
Yeah. It's a very, very wide gray line, I think, at this point, and especially with so much reality television. Anyone that's on a reality show, they don't need a costume designer, they need a wardrobe stylist, but it's still a 30 minute to an hour programming. It gets confusing.

Georgette:
Yeah, absolutely. What was the catalyst that led you down this career path?

Jill:
I have always been interested in clothing. From a very young age, I remember going to, I grew up in Ohio, I don't know if you're familiar with Gabriel's? Gabriel's makes Ross Dress For Less look like Bergdorf Goodman. It's the clothing that's severely damaged, it might have a rip in it, a tear, some sort of weird stain, it might be half there. And I remember, as a young kid, just going through rack after rack after rack with my mom, but loving it because everything was so different than you could find in a conventional off the rack store. And then, when I got to Emerson, there really wasn't an outlet to be, per se, the costume designer or the stylist. I remember I did a few student films and I did props and clothing and I think it was at Emerson, my junior or senior year, I was like, "Oh, this is an aspect of the film program that I haven't really been aware of and I love it. It's just as important to the story as the director of photography, which is so much more well known or the production designer," but it just wasn't taught.

Georgette:
Wow. Yeah. There is a store similar to what you were describing in Ohio that my friend put me onto and I was like, "Oh, name brand stuff?" I mean, we know about Ross and Marshalls, but [inaudible 00:04:24]-

Jill:
Uh-huh (affirmative).

Georgette:
Every time I go to my mom's house in Virginia, I'm like, "Let me just go here, see if there's some purses, thing like that."

Jill:
Treasures. There are treasures and you never know what it's going to be.

Georgette:
Absolutely. Because we know how expensive things are in New York, so I'm like, "What could I bring back that look like I got this in New York?" Absolutely. You were talking about when you went to Emerson. If you could go back in time to your Emerson self, even your younger self, what would you say?

Jill:
I would say, "You're going to figure it out. You're good. It's going to be a windy road, but you'll get to what you need to be doing with your life." I wish there was maybe a clearer path just in terms of, okay, you're interested in film, you like clothing, here is a class that you can take at a Boston fashion school that'll help intertwine your curriculum. And I bet, at this point, there is. When I was there, it just wasn't anything that was as well known as it is today.

I didn't really know what a stylist was in college. And by the time I got to LA and was in the LA program, I did but it was a tricky time on the internet and the world of fashion where it's just not everything is as well known as it is today. I always thought that if you were a costume designer, you were only doing theater, for whatever reason, and I don't know why. And even to this day, if I ask someone that's not in the industry, sorry, if they ask me what I do and I say a costume designer, they're like, "Oh, for theater." And I'm always like, "No, TV and film." So I guess it is something that's universally confused.

Georgette:
Right, because when you think costume, you're thinking that you're getting dressed up and I could see why the connection to the theater exists.

Jill:
Yes. Uh-huh (affirmative). And costume design, I just think of an old Victorian gown. It's just what comes to mind. But no, I'm just styling people in contemporary clothing, for the most part.

Georgette:
I love it. I love it. What connected you to Boston from, Ohio? Why Emerson%

Jill:
So random. I loved Good Will Hunting. I was like, "I need to live in Boston." And then whenever I guess I Yahoo'ed, I asked Jeeves, at that point, that's what you did.

Georgette:
Oh, my gosh. I forgot about Ask Jeeves.

Jill:
Ask Jeeves, yeah. I asked Jeeves, "What is a film school in Boston?" And truly, Emerson came up and that was it. I was like, "Done. I found my college."

Georgette:
It was that simple for you?

Jill:
Yeah. Thank you, Matt Damon.

Georgette:
But those that are nine over this whole process on getting to where you are being in your field or even our industry of TV and film. What are some paths or things that you can share with them? Because it didn't look the same when you came in it, but now, there's so many more resources.

Jill:
I would say anyone that wants to get into a creative field where you don't necessarily get a springboard job into it, you don't come in and as a PA, necessarily. You can do that, but at the same time, find projects where you can actually be the costume designer, you can be the production designer, you can actually take stock of what the story is and think about what you would put people in. And if it's a student film or an independent film, no matter where you are, if it's Cleveland, if it's Boston, just doing it is the best way to figure out if this is for you.

Georgette:
I've told people that, please do not discount your own personal projects, your friends projects. There's a lot to be said about jumping on and taking initiative.

Jill:
If it's dressing up your younger sister, do it. Style your younger sister for a week, for her going to school, just do it.

Georgette:
Yeah. Now, you also met your husband, Eric Hutchison.

Jill:
I did. Yeah.

Georgette:
He went to Emerson. He's a singer songwriter. Have your career paths ever crossed? How did that story happen and how are you on navigating creative fields?

Jill:
He came out of Emerson and he got pretty young success, I would say, as a singer songwriter. He was on Warner Brothers when we started dating. And I remember Warner brothers wanted to hire a really professional well-known stylist and I was like, "I can do it," and they wouldn't let me and I remember I got really pissed off, but at the time, I was like, "No, I shouldn't have gotten that job." It was someone that had been working for years. That was the only time where we really crossed where it was a bit of a altercation. Also, on my part, I was like, "I can do this, just let me do it." And he was like, "Jill, just let the label pick who they want to do it," and I was like, "Fine." But since then, as my career, I think I've slowly gotten to a point where everyone that's working with him trusts his wife to do it, which is also tricky. I think it's similar to anything that your significant other does or your partner, if you're like, "Oh, my partner does that, blah, blah, blah," the initial response from the professionals around is like, "Oh, God, no. We can't have the wife doing it." But at this point, I actually can do it.

Georgette:
That's awesome.

Jill:
Yeah.

Georgette:
Now, different things stick out in our minds from school, some useful, some not, and yet, we can't seem to forget them. Is there anything you learned at Emerson that didn't feel relevant or useful at the time, but later turned out to be?

Jill:
Yes. I would say, actually, at the time, I didn't discount how funny everyone I was friends with was and how impossibly creative the people that I was going to school with were, and talking to my friends at home, I remember, in college, I was like, "No, they are so funny. Everyone is so creative." And at the time, you're in college, you think everyone is really cool that you just met. But now, after being out of school for more than a decade, everyone is at the top of their game. Everyone is at the top of their field. So actually, they are as impossibly creative as I thought they were. They are as funny. And everyone works their ass off at Emerson and everyone still is. I realized how funny everyone was and how talented they were, but now, going into our adult lives, I was like, "Whoa, they are that great."

Georgette:
It's something about Emerson that just brings out the creative in you, and there's no way to describe it, right? When you meet Emersonians, they're just like, yeah. Yeah.

Jill:
It's like everyone has come from a different planet and they've all just ended up at Emerson and then you're all like, "Oh, yeah, these are all my people."

Georgette:
It just makes sense. It just clicks. Yeah, it's just like, "Yeah, we just gotten a flow with it."

Jill:
Yeah.

Georgette:
You landed, you are the costume designer of SNL, Saturday Night Live.

Jill:
Yes.

Georgette:
How did you learn that role? And what has your experience been like working on a show that's been around for so many years?

Jill:
To clarify, I'm the costume designer of the film unit.

Georgette:
The film unit, okay, yes.

Jill:
There are two costume designers that do the live show and they hired me. And then, I've been there, at this point, which is shocking, I was telling someone the other day, I've been there for eight years and the eight years since I've been there, the film unit has just exploded to the point where it needs its own department and I've been there long enough, so I'm in charge.

Jill:
But I started because one of my best friends in New York City was a writer there and she ended up being a head writer. Her name is Sarah Schneider, she worked with another one of my good friends over there that she met named Chris Kelly. They are now the creators of the other two. So it was with her that I sent my resume in and then I knew a tailor because I was on another job, so it was a two pronged approach where they couldn't ignore me because two of their coworkers ... Like, "Fine, we'll meet her." And then, I hit it off immediately with Tom Brocker and Eric Justinian who are the two designers of the live show and I just slowly kept on trucking.

Georgette:
Yeah. It looks really good. And I didn't even realize, I remember reading that there was a film unit, but in my mind, when you watch SNL, everything's the same.

Jill:
It is confusing because even to a random person watching it, it's hard to take into account that, oh, this was shot probably two days ago and now, they're doing the live portion of it, but there is an entire studio for just the film unit at this point, because there's at least three a week that we shoot. Anything that is a parody music video, a commercial, a short film, that's everything that is under my umbrella.

Georgette:
Okay. And then, that gets plugged in with the actual show with they're doing the live piece. Okay. That makes sense.

Jill:
Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Georgette:
Is there any job or thing that has happened in your career that ever made you question if you should still be doing this?

Jill:
Once I found my footing as a costume designer and someone that can excel with comedy, and it's not just comedy that I do, I do a wide umbrella of costume design, but prior to that, I was doing some episodical television. It just wasn't clicking. And prior to that, I was do styling and as much as I liked it, that also wasn't clicking. But I just slowly worked towards the path of, oh, I need to be doing costume design that is exciting to me.

Jill:
I think when I was doing more of the fashion side of, I guess, putting wardrobe on people that are on television, that never clicked for me, but I just kept searching for what I knew, what I was supposed to be doing, even though I didn't know what it was. And it wasn't until I landed the job at SNL where I was like, "Oh, this is it. I figured it out." And week to week, sometimes I'll get frustrated or it'll be a sketch I don't like, but the good thing about SNL is that it's so quick, by the time you're sick of it, it's over and you're onto the next week, so you really can't contemplate if I liked what I did that week because it's over.

Georgette:
Right.

Jill:
So that's good. I found that short form works really well for me. I'm, by nature, a procrastinator and in the SNL world, there's no time to procrastinate because by the time you figured out what it is, you're shooting it. And I would say, going back to where I wasn't sure if I enjoyed what I was doing, styling was always tough for me because it was moreso that you're in the palm of the hand of who you're working for. If your client isn't huge, then, a showroom or a PR place won't want to work with you because they don't want to put their clothes on this celebrity. And I found, when I switched over to television and film, you're purchasing it, so you can be as creative as you want it. You're not beholden to a designer or a showroom.

Georgette:
Yeah. Was there a certain amount or a level of pressure coming onto an established show that's been around for so long?

Jill:
There was, and I think a lot of the pressure was on myself, of course, because it's SNL, you don't want to do a bad job there, but the people that I started working with, I just fell into a very quick rhythm and it just worked out well. I remember, my first show there, Miley Cyrus was the host and I think it was the Wrecking Ball tour and we had to make a fake music video. Oh, man. I don't even ... I forget ... It was on one of her songs and it was politically minded and I just got it. And then, at that point, I was like, "Oh, they're going to ask me back." And then, week after week they did. And then, I kept coming back and I was like, "Oh, this is working. Great."

Georgette:
You go.

Jill:
And of course, I remember there's always little things that'll make me crazy. I had to do a Lonely Island video and that was with Andy Sandberg and I like just tore myself up for weeks because he was playing a DJ and I forgot to give him rings. And you kept seeing his hands because he was using all of the knobs and I was like, "Oh, man, I blew it." But no one noticed except me.

Georgette:
Right. Of course. Because you're the details.

Jill:
Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Uh-huh (affirmative). Yeah.

Georgette:
[crosstalk 00:17:03] the details. Yeah.

Jill:
Yeah. Yes.

Georgette:
Are there challenges that come with this career and what could you say to somebody that has started or got their footing and they're still not getting that break that they're looking for?

Jill:
I think what's really hard about it, and it's anyone that's a freelancer, is that you can never plan financially. You can hope, financially, that you're always going to get the next job, but it's really tricky to balance your expectation of your creativity with actually, can I live? And I would say to anyone that feels like they just haven't gotten their break or they're not there yet financially, just keep plugging away at it. If you keep doing it, you'll make it work.

Georgette:
Absolutely. That makes sense. Absolutely. Yeah, creatively speaking, I know I'm currently working for myself and then catching freelance gigs here and there. But the one thing I've always heard is, if people like you they'll continue to hire you.

Jill:
Yes. And if you need to keep doing it, do the best job possible and you'll get there. You'll make it, literally and figuratively.

Georgette:
Absolutely. Now, no matter what we do now, our experience at Emerson has influenced who we are today. Every institution leaves a fingerprint on us. What do you think that Emerson mark left on you?

Jill:
Emerson taught, always have fun. You have to have fun. Be yourself, have fun, and then everything else will fall into place. Truly. That's it. Have fun.

Georgette:
Were you always affirmed that Emerson was where you needed to be? What did that look like for you, if so?

Jill:
It was. I went to Emerson when AOL chat was still a thing and I found my roommate there through AOL member profile. And we were scared because at that point, it was like, oh my God, is everyone at Emerson going to have blue hair? Are they going to be total punks? Because I guess it's grown into this institution that is so well respected and interesting, but at that time, it wasn't as big as it is now and I met her and immediately, again, we just got along. She was from Connecticut. I was from Ohio. And I just kept meeting people, throughout the first two years I was there, who spoke the same language as me. Yeah, I love it. I love the place. My husband and I, he proposed to me, actually, in Boston. He started Jimmy's Traveling All Stars. Are you aware of any of the comedy troops?

Georgette:
A couple of them. I feel like I've heard of that one, though.

Jill:
I guess it's the cool one. I don't know, but that's what I've heard. I think it went through a down slope and it wasn't that cool and now, it's back up. Anyways, they were having a Jimmy's Traveling All Stars reunion and I went with him and he proposed and at the same time, the norovirus was making its way around Emerson. So he proposed, and then I just projectile vomited, I remember, in the Emerson bathroom afterwards and I was like, "Whoa, love made me so sick." But no, actually, I just had the norovirus.

Georgette:
Wow.

Jill:
Yeah. Yeah. I remember one of the faculty members told me, they're like, "Oh, yeah, kids were just puking all over the halls, it was a nightmare."

Georgette:
All over the place. Wow.

Jill:
Yeah.

Georgette:
Oh, my gosh. I can't even imagine what this campus looked like around that time when that was going on.

Jill:
Just barf.

Georgette:
Simply put.

Jill:
Yeah.

Georgette:
Simply put

Jill:
Yes. Emerson will always be there.

Georgette:
Yes. Absolutely. In so many different ways and forms. Emerson students and grads are known for speaking up, advocating, we voice our opinions. What's one thing you have a real strong opinion about and how often do you share it and with whom?

Jill:
I am, over the past year, I've always been a vegetarian, I am finally out of the closet as a full fledged vegan, which, especially in my industry, is hard because I will buy leather and I won't buy fur anymore even if it's for a production, but it's very hard to balance what I will put on my body and then what I will buy for someone else. I'm a huge animal advocate and a vegan and I will not stand for it. And it's been hard for me because no one likes a vegan.

Georgette:
People have very strong opinions about that.

Jill:
Yes. I think people think that it I'm trying to tell them they have to be a vegan. I'm like, "No, I just, I can't wear leather. I'm sorry. I can't."

Georgette:
It works for you.

Jill:
Yes. It works for me. But as one of the writers at SNL has actually said, Julio Torres, he's like, "I am a vegan, but I also want to have friends."

Georgette:
Oh, I can't. That's hilarious.

Jill:
Yeah. Yeah.

Georgette:
That's so funny. I hear him. I feel that.

Jill:
I know. And for a while, I wouldn't, when we were out to dinner, I just couldn't say it. The wait staff would be like, "Does anyone have any questions? Allergies?" It was like...

Georgette:
Allergies.

Jill:
Yeah. Allergies. And then, I would be like, "I don't eat meat." And they're like, "Okay, great. So we have a lot of stuff on the menu that has eggs or dairy." I was like, "I don't eat eggs or dairy." And then, they'd be like, "Okay ... " And then, it'd be like, "Ugh, I guess I'm a vegan." And then, they would be, "Just say it, lady, what's your problem?"

Georgette:
Yeah.

Jill:
But yeah, it's a whole thing.

Georgette:
It's hard to navigate that, yeah.

Jill:
Yeah.

Georgette:
Are there any mistakes that you're glad you made?

Jill:
I'm glad that it took me a while, it took me a decent portion of my twenties to figure out what my place in the fashion world is. I started, I was in LA and I was working as a PA on, actually, The Amazing Race. And I remember I basically would ship things and I was started shipping clothes and at that point I was like, "Oh, yes, I do want to be involved with clothing, but I don't know exactly what that is." And then through just networking, I talked to another person who got me a job and I was a production assistant in the wardrobe department of commercials. And at the same time, I also did not love LA. I wanted to and I just could not make it work for me and I decided that I needed to move back to New York, so I did it.

Jill:
And within a week, through another friend of a friend, I got a job with June. And at that point, I was like, "Oh, I like this. This is right. This is the correct path." And then, after a couple years of doing that, as much as I loved her, I was like, "I'm not meant to just be a stylist." And then, I started doing commercials again. And then, through that, I met someone else and I worked with Isaac Mizrahi, strictly fashion fashion. I was doing advertising for him as well as all his runway shows. So at the time I was so frustrated because I felt like I was making momentum, but it was never in the correct path. It wasn't until I had done all of those things and I got the job at SNL and I realized I had such a wide umbrella of knowledge that I was actually much more aware at that point of how much education I had within clothing and I could make the correct decision of what exactly I wanted my job to be, and therefore be better at it.

Georgette:
Are there any lessons that you had to learn the hard way? Because I think sometimes, people feel like you walk into this career, you do this, you do that. But sometimes, there's multiple roadblocks that get you to finally realizing what you want, and just curious on what you may have learned the hard way.

Jill:
You know what? It's a funny one because you don't really think about it when you think about being a costume designer or a stylist, it was really hard for me to be organized. I am not an organized person and there's such a huge aspect of it where you need to keep track of your receipts, which duh, of course, you do, but I lost a few jobs and I wasn't asked back when I was younger because I would lose receipts and-

Georgette:
Wow. Yeah.

Jill:
... that was a big, just training myself to be a more organized person was very hard, especially with the education of Emerson. You're not taking business 101 if you want to be a ...

Georgette:
You don't go to Emerson for business.

Jill:
Yeah, exactly. Even though I know they have a pretty good business school, at some point, but yeah, so that was a big roadblock, a silly one, but still, every day, I like have to keep track of my shit.

Georgette:
Yeah. It's funny you said that, because on the side of production, I would have to be the one collecting your receipts, so it was a big deal.

Jill:
It's a big deal. And then, you don't want to be the person that loses the receipts because they're not going to ask you back. Receipts are money.

Georgette:
They are, especially for the production management department. We were going nuts about that. We were always asking [crosstalk 00:26:07] team.

Jill:
I know. And then, I started to get a lot of jobs and as the head of the department, I am a full stickler. You do not lose your clothes, you do not lose receipts, which is, of course, the easiest thing to understand, but to learn it when you're in the middle of trying to be creative, it's very hard to keep them both straight.

Georgette:
Yeah. Yeah. It's funny that, because that's not one thing that I would've thought about, you could always assume people look organized and when you're in that field, you just kind of project, of course, she's organized, she works in this field.

Jill:
And at this point, I am, but damn, I had to work at it.

Georgette:
Right. Yeah. For sure. For sure.

Jill:
Uh-huh (affirmative).

Georgette:
If you had to switch careers, what would you do?

Jill:
Two things. I've thought about this. I am really interested in future trends, not just with clothing and fashion, but in the way that people are living their lives. So trend forecaster would be something that would be really interesting to me, just watching how different people are living three years ago, prior to the pandemic, to now and what everyone is interested and how it's changed, that's fascinating to me. And the other thing is a wild card. I would love to be someone that makes fake teeth.

Georgette:
Okay.

Jill:
Bear with me here. If you get a bridge or veneers, there's an art to it. You're actually not a dentist. And I've knocked my teeth out three times, so I constantly am staring at everyone's teeth, but there is an art to making sure that the teeth and the color you pick match the person's face and immediately, you think, "Oh, nice, big white Chicklet teeth are the way to go," but they're not. And you have to really form the shape and the shade and it's weird, but I'd do it.

Georgette:
Wow. I used to have conversations with people because I didn't realize they had to shave your teeth down ...

Jill:
To get a veneer. All of my teeth are fake, my top six teeth.

Georgette:
Really?

Jill:
Yeah.

Georgette:
Oh, my gosh. But it fascinated you going through the process of getting it done.

Jill:
Yes. Uh-huh (affirmative). Yeah. And I guess that's still in the creative field. Making teeth? Yeah.

Georgette:
I was going to say, because I didn't know they weren't dentists. I just, I didn't think about it.

Jill:
Yeah. It's more of a mentor situation.

Georgette:
[crosstalk 00:28:41]-

Jill:
Yeah. You work with a person and they teach you the craft. The tooth craft. So yeah, I'd be a tooth crafter.

Georgette:
Okay. Is there anything that you'd like to try next? And if there is, why haven't you tried it yet?

Jill:
I really am enjoying working on episodic television. The other show that I do, The Other Two, it's very, have you watched it? Do you know what it is?

Georgette:
Which ones?

Jill:
The Other Two. It's a who's on first situation. Everyone's like, the other two what? No one ever knows what I'm talking about when I say, "I work on The Other Two." And then, they say, "The other two what?" And I say, "No, The Other Two."

And it goes around and around and I'm like, "It's a show named The Other Two." Yeah. I love working on that show. It is from the brains of two SNL writers. They were the head writers there. We are similarly minded in the way that we approach a joke or a storyline between the costume designer and the writer, so I'm very familiar with that, but I really enjoy working in a longer form format where I can actually think of about the characters and think about where they started and how they're going to end up over the arc of a season.

And with SNL, mainly, you need the quickest read. So this person is a sailor working in Massachusetts, how do we do that? And that's the whole character. But with The Other Two, you have people that are going through ups and downs, you grow with them, so that is a very different way of costuming than it would be for a commercial or something really quick, which I'm very well versed in. So it's just using a different type of my skills, which I enjoy. And when I do movies, same thing, and even doing a movie is different because you have an hour to figure it out, who is this person? And they go through, sometimes, broader sweeps of a change or smaller, so yeah, I'm enjoying that.

Georgette:
I was going to ask if we're going to see you doing more longer from films and episodic?

Jill:
I think so, yes. I would like to. I don't know how long I'll be at SNL. I love it there, but it's very easy, with the schedule, for me, to work on SNL and other television shows as long as they're in New York, but it's just, I can't get out of the city.

Georgette:
Right. Right, right, right. And something, because you mentioned earlier about LA not being the place you wanted to live. I always try to tell people, there's this synergy and the magnetism living in New York City. I'm just not able to describe it.

Jill:
Yes.

Georgette:
And I get it, New York has its shit, right? But ...

Jill:
Right.

Georgette:
But it's just New York.

Jill:
But it's my shit. Yeah. Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah.

Georgette:
It's New York. It's New York.

Jill:
Yeah. All of my, not all of, but I would say a good portion of my friends still live in LA, but it was just the homogenous nature that I could really never get used to, that it was always the same weather, you have to go into the car every day and those hours that were just eaten up sitting in that traffic really got to me.

Georgette:
Yeah. I love visiting.

Jill:
I need to be able to move.

Georgette:
I love visiting.

Jill:
Yes. Love it.

Georgette:
But New York is headquarters.

Jill:
Yeah. Yeah. It is. It is.

Georgette:
And lastly, what does it mean for you to make it and how will Jill know when she gets there?

Jill:
That's a great question. I think, with anyone that's creative, there's always going to be self-doubt while you're creating, and then even when it's done and you've done as much as you can and you were reflecting on it. But I think it's finding the peace, the P-E-A-C-E, in knowing that I tried as hard as I could at the time and I'm able to look back and see a couple flaws, but very proud of the work that I did and what I created.

Georgette:
Love that. Cheers to that. Jill, I can't wait to see more of your stuff out there.

Jill:
Yeah. Oh, thank you.

Georgette:
I'm sure our paths will cross in the industry.

Jill:
I'm sure. Yeah.

Georgette:
I love it. Thank you so much.

Jill:
Yeah, thank you.

Georgette:
Making It Big In 30 minutes is sponsored by the Emerson College office of alumni engagement and supported by the alumni board of directors. Stay in touch with the Emerson community. Join us over at Emerge, a digital platform where Emersonian go to connect. Go to emerge.emerson.edu for more.